Everyone Needs to Be Bright at Night

Tuesday, September 27 by silvia

Cyclist with various reflective gear

photo courtesy of www.pedbikeimages.org / Diana Redwood

It?s no longer light when many of us head off or come home from work, or go jogging or walking, and it will soon be darker for many more of us. The West Windsor Bicycle and Pedestrian Alliance strongly urges pedestrians, joggers and bicyclists to be bright at night.

The dark coats and jackets most of us favor make it hard for motorists to see us; the Federal Highway Administration says a driver will first see someone wearing blue 55 feet away and someone in white from 180 feet ? but won?t be able to stop in time for either if he?s going 40 mph.

Even when walking in our neighborhoods, where traffic is slower, being visible helps everyone stay safe.

The WWBPA will demonstrate and sell a wide range of items at the West Windsor Farmers? Market on Sat., Oct. 1 that will make you more visible: vests, belts and briefcase straps with reflective materials, small lights to hang off the end of purses and backpacks and of course lights and reflective tape for bikes. Come see us between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. in the Vaughn Drive commuter parking lot off Alexander Road.

You can?t be too visible.

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Bike the Sharrows

Thursday, September 22 by silvia

Sustainble Princeton invites everyone to experience the new sharrows on its “Be Green, Be Seen” mass bike and skate ride on Sunday, Oct. 2. The group will set off from Hinds Plaza (by the Princeton library) at 3 p.m. for a two-mile ride.?(“Be Green, Be Seen” will run until 5 p.m.)?Sharrows have been installed on a number of local roads, including Nassau, Harrison and Witherspoon streets. The route will cover parts of those streets plus Hamilton Avenue.l

What’s a sharrow? A shared-lane marking when it’s just not feasible to install a full bicycle lane. You can read about their success elsewhere here.

Here’s the full message from Sustainable Princeton:

Unlock those bikes and come ride on the bike sharrows!
Cyclists and skateboarders, all ages, all skill levels are invited to take part in a short ride along the newly marked sharrows along Princeton?s streets.
Bike for the environment, bike to support the BYOBag campaign or just bike for fun? but please join us to show that we love the new Sharrows and look forward to more support for healthy, sustainable, fun-loving bikers and skaters.
Remember your helmets!
The more people who attend the ride, the bigger the statement.
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Proposed Route 571 Main Street Design Unsafe

Tuesday, September 13 by JerryFoster

571/Wallace-Cranbury morning commute 2The WWBPA responded to the county’s proposed CR 571 Main Street design recently, maintaining that it is unsafe for everyone: motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians alike. In the past 10 years, two pedestrians were killed on this stretch of roadway (2004 and 2005), while no motorists were killed.? A 17-year-old motorist was killed in 2006, however, just west of downtown Princeton Junction, when she lost control of her car on the curve coming off the bridge over the train tracks.

The proposed wider-straighter-faster design does nothing to address these safety issues. Instead, it preserves the current 45mph design speed and 40mph posted speed limit. Drivers don’t respect crosswalks when they have to slow from high speed, and the proposed design does nothing to provide pedestrian refuges in the center of the roadway to promote safe crossing.

Rt 571 Concept Illustration

The design also features a new two-way center left turn lane (TWLTL) that studies have shown to be unsafe; AARP calls them “suicide lanes.” One study even showed that artificially lowering the posted speed limit, but not the design speed, caused an increase in crashes.

Picture 7

Here’s a picture of Hamilton’s SR 33 that most resembles what is planned. The 45mph design speed is simply not appropriate for the pedestrian friendly Main Street that our Redevelopment Plan envisions. A survey of other Mercer County towns shows that Princeton, Lawrenceville, Hightstown, Hopewell and Pennington all have 25 – 30mph speed limits on their Main Streets. Why not in West Windsor?

The WWBPA is not just opining, and we’re not just complaining – our response, and our recommendations based on the December 2009 Public Review, are founded on research and guidelines from the New Jersey Department of Transportation. We are recommending constructive, Complete Streets alternatives to remedy the safety issues and make a Main Street that we can all be proud of.

The current design shows why Mercer County should adopt a Complete Streets policy to complement the state and West Windsor township policies – our transportation network needs jurisdictions with consistent policies to benefit our taxpayers.

Thanks to everyone who has gotten involved to support our position! We appreciate all of you who have signed our petition at the Farmers’ Market, or who have contacted the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission, which recently conducted public outreach on this and other federally-funded projects.

More help is needed. Please contact our public officials to support our position. With a lower design speed and pedestrian refuges, our senior residents can cross Route 571 safely to the new Rite Aid, and our children can cross Route 571 safely to the new ex-Acme shopping center, as well as to the high school. And our teenage drivers should be able to keep control of their vehicles when going more slowly. Everyone benefits.

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Be Visible, Use Sidewalks and Be Safe

Friday, September 9 by silvia

As daylight hours get shorter, a letter from a friend of the WWBPA couldn’t be more timely.

She writes:
“I have been taking my husband to the station and picking him up five days a week for many years.? We travel down Alexander Road to Scott Avenue, making a right on Wallace, then a left into the station driveway.? I am on Scott Avenue four times per day.? In recent years, it has become a challenge to weave around the pedestrians who prefer to walk in the street rather than use the sidewalk.
We believe the traffic — cars AND walkers/bicyclists –?has increased significantly in recent years and, despite the pedestrian improvements such as painted walkways, the risk of a vehicle/pedestrian and/or bike?accident is growing.
Please USE THE SIDEWALK on Scott Avenue — rather than walking (or?running) on the paved street — and USE THE NEW?CROSSWALKS instead of jay-walking diagonally?across the streets to and from the station.

Follow common-sense rules of road-sharing and safety, such as “stop and look both ways before crossing” and “don’t assume the motorist sees you.” And don‘t wear all dark clothing when riding a bike at night.”

And a message from the WWBPA: One way to be more visible is to wear a reflective vest. The WWBPA sells them for just $10. Come see us at the farmers’ market.

Why might walkers on Scott Avenue prefer to walk in the road rather than on the sidewalk? Please comment with your views.


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A Much-Improved Intersection

Monday, September 5 by silvia

We’ve organized an educational walk, we’ve advocated and campaigned, we’ve waited and waited, and now with the completion of the new Rite Aid we finally have pedestrian crosswalks across all four roads at the Cranbury/Wallace/Route 571 intersection in Princeton Junction.

This intersection had the dubious honor of being top-ranked (or maybe bottom-ranked) in the 2008 WWBPA intersection inventory. As with many of the recent sidewalk and intersection improvements, this huge addition to walkability and safety was done with relatively little Township money; in this case the funds were largely state, county and private.

Is the intersection now perfect? It’s certainly a lot better, but lack of pedestrian refuges on the Route 571 crossings, poor visibility for vehicles coming off the bridge and turning right onto Wallace, and countdown lights that are still unreachable for wheelchair users forces us to give the intersection less than a triple-A rating.

In the “you can’t get there from here” department, lack of sidewalks on either side of Route 571 mean that it’s not possible to walk safely from the new Rite Aid to the soon-to-be-remodeled Acme shopping center. Well that’s technically not quite true: the safe route is now along Wallace, up Scott and along Alexander.

Sometimes things move slower than we’d like, but this intersection, along with many other intersection and sidewalk improvements over the last six months, is making West Windsor a better place to walk, or in the case of our wheelchair-bound trustee Michael, roll.

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Watch the Crosswalks!

Saturday, August 27 by silvia

Responding to concerns voiced by the Township Council, the West Windsor police are enforcing the new state law which protects pedestrians by making it mandatory for motorists to stop for pedestrians in crosswalks. They also want pedestrians to stay in the crosswalks.

The law say motorists are not allowed to move again until the pedestrian is more than one lane away.? (On a two-lane road, this means until the pedestrian has crossed the road.? On a four-lane road, this means until the pedestrian is in front of traffic going the other way.)

Erring motorists are receiving tickets and points.

Police are also citing pedestrians who do not stay in the crosswalk (where one is available) when crossing a road, especially pedestrians who cross two streets at once in a diagonal line.

Pedestrians also shouldn’t assume that motorists see them

Everyone–motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians–treat each other with courtesy and enhance road safety for all!

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A Bicycle and Pedestrian Path on South Post Road

Tuesday, August 2 by silvia

Construction is expected to start in late August or early September on an eight-foot-wide multi-use path along the Mercer County golf course on South Post Road from Village Road West to Conover Road. Most of the cost is covered by a grant from the NJ Department of Transportation.

The path will let kids bike safely to the ball fields at the corner of Conover Road and give rowers at the Caspersen Rowing Center a safe place to run.

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The WWBPA at National Night Out

Sunday, July 31 by silvia

The West Windsor Bicycle and Pedestrian Alliance will be at West Windsor’s National Night Out event on Tuesday, Aug. 2. This will be from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Community Park, rain or shine, and is being put on by the West Windsor Police Department. The WWBPA will be talking bike and pedestrian safety and will have a drawing with plenty of bike and pedestrian-related goodies for those who take our bike safety quiz.

The police are promising music, inflatable bounce houses, a dunk tank, food, dance performances, a magician, a face painter and a pony ride. Many other community groups, including police, fire, K-9 and rescue services, will be represented.

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Walk and Bike Safely, For ESL Students

Monday, July 11 by silvia

From our friends at the League of American Bicyclists:

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s new Walk and Bike Safely beginning-level curriculum is designed for adult English language learners and is a useful tool for teachers or volunteers working with adult immigrants who are learning English. The product is in English and uses a more pictorial approach than the previously posted Intermediate level curriculum on the same subject matter. Walk and Bike Safely consists of six lessons each covering a different safety message. Both the beginning-level and intermediate-level curriculum can be accessed from either NHTSA’s pedestrian or bicycle Web sites.

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Helmet Rewards

Saturday, June 25 by silvia

Here’s a case of when it pays off to be stopped by the police:

Police departments in several Middlesex County municipalities, including Plainsboro and Cranbury, are giving a “summons” to any kid spotted wearing a helmet while biking (or doing another wheeled activity) between June 21 and Sept. 30. Each summons can be redeemed for free items, such as a scoop of ice cream or slice of pizza, and enters the child in a raffle drawing for a new helmet and bicycle at the end of the campaign.

Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital’s Safe Kids Middlesex County is once again partnering with county and local governments to make this program happen. You can read more about it here.

Wearing a helmet isn’t just the law for kids under 17; it makes sense for cyclists of all ages. You only have one brain, and even an seemingly innocent fall the wrong way can do serious damage.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, approximately 190,000 children sustain head injuries each year while participating in wheeled activities. Brain injuries often have lifelong effects, such as problems with thought processes, mobility and emotions. There is no cure for brain injury so prevention is extremely important.

Talk to the WWBPA about how to fit your helmet properly so it doesn’t slide around. There’s a science to it!

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Public Comment Needed on Route 571 Main Street Project

Wednesday, June 22 by JerryFoster

The Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC) is putting out the New Jersey? federal transportation improvement projects for comment, including the Route 571 project between Clarksville and Cranbury roads. You can find details here:

The West Windsor Bicycle and Pedestrian Alliance’s recommendations for the project are here:

The current design calls for adding a center left turn lane, sidewalks and a bicycle-compatible shoulder, maintaining the existing design speed (45mph).

The problem is that the combination of same design speed, the additional center turn lane and roadway widening, but no pedestrian refuges halfway across the road will make it harder, not easier, to cross the street.

Essentially, there will be 30% more cars to dodge when crossing, which will be going faster than today, since they wouldn’t have to slow down for left-turning vehicles (which will be in the new center turn lane).

In our view, Route 571 is already too hard to cross, and this design will make it worse. Please join us in adding your comments to the DVRPC by following the instructions on their web page.

The stated goals are for a bicycle and pedestrian friendly main street, but the design details do not support the goals, according to the NJDOT Smart Transportation Guidebook. On the plus side, the recommended changes will save money and most importantly give us a Main Street we can be proud of, while still increasing? capacity.

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More Sidewalks and Bike Lanes!

Thursday, June 16 by silvia

What an incredible year for new sidewalks and bike lanes in West Windsor!

Schlumberger sidewalkYou’ve probably already seen the improvements around the train station, including better crossings, the sidewalk on the Schlumberger side and the striped shoulders that give cyclists some added comfort. There also are three key links in the sidewalk network that went in last month and finally allow people to walk to and from the Toll Brother developments, Windsor Haven and the farmers’ market over the railroad bridge on Alexander Road and to the library, Maurice Hawk and the Arts Center. Those parking at the Wallace Road lot for Arts Council events now have a much more direct walk as well.

Now work has started on Penn-Lyle Road that not only will repave the road surface but add sidewalks to the east side of the road between Village Road West and Stony Brook Way as well as bike lanes on both sides of the road. This will let more students walk or bike safely to High School South.

We also hear that work is progressing for the multi-use trail planned along South Post Road near the ballfields. If all goes smoothly, the project could soon go out to bid, with an aim of construction in September or October.

The WWBPA has long advocated for these improvements, and we thank township officials, including the mayor and council, for making them.

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Ride of Silence is Wednesday

Tuesday, May 17 by silvia

Join with thousands of others around the world in honoring cyclists killed or injured on the roads by taking part in a one-hour Ride of Silence.

Three are planned in the Mercer County area, and the West Windsor ride will leave at 7 p.m. from the Municipal Center parking lot. This FREE ride is the only one of the three that will include a funeral hearse in the procession! Many thanks to Mather-Hodge Funeral Home for providing one.

The ride will be about 10 miles and last one hour. We will ride as a group and of course obey all traffic laws. Helmets are required. Think about how to be particularly visible …turn on your lights, wear a reflective vest.

Check on Wednesday if the weather looks dicey. (No ride if it’s raining; we’ll aim to reschedule.)

Did you see the write-ups in the Trenton Times and the Princeton Packet?

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Bike to Work Week

Sunday, May 15 by silvia

National Bike to Work Week is this week!

Did you know that a mere?30-minute ride to and from work?at a leisurely pace burns?500 calories?!

You can find the WWBPA at three events:

A bikers’ breakfast at the Princeton Junction train station on Tuesday, co-hosted with Greater Mercer Transportation Management Association. Stop by between 6:30 a.m. (we’ll aim to be there closer to 6) and 8:30 a.m. for a cup of coffee and some food. It’s our way of saying thanks for biking! You’ll find us on the southbound side. We’ll be happy to chat even if you’re not on your bike.

A Ride of Silence at 7 p.m. on Wednesday that leaves from the Municipal Center parking lot. This is a one-hour, 10-mile ride to honor those injured or killed on the road. Many thanks to Mather-Hodge Funeral Home and Peter Hodge for providing a funeral hearse for our procession of riders! You can read more about it in this Princeton Packet article. The ride will be cancelled if it’s raining. If the weather looks questionable, check the website and Facebook page for updates.

A “Learn to Bike” class aimed at kids 5 years old and older on Saturday at the West Windsor Farmers’ Market on Vaughn Drive. This uses a safe and effective method that doesn’t involve clutching the back of a bike. The class is free but space is limited, so we suggest pre-registering via [email protected]. Please bring a working bike. A helmet is required (the WWBPA will be selling them for $10). Sessions will run continuously during farmers’ market hours; please arrive between 9 a.m. and noon.

In addition, GMTMA is hosting a bikers breakfast at the Trenton train station from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. on Monday and? a “lunch and learn” session at the Princeton library on Friday to spotlight what Hoboken is doing to promote walking and biking. The session runs from 12:15 p.m. to 2 p.m. and includes lunch refreshments. Space is limited, so pre-register by emailing [email protected].

Through a variety of innovative planning, transportation, and parking strategies, Hoboken, New Jersey is rapidly transforming itself into one of the most bikeable and pedestrian-friendly municipalities in New Jersey. The consulting firm Civic Eye Collaborative recently produced a film that documents some of the strategies that have been implemented to reduce the need for automobile ownership, and to enhance and promote access to transit and other non-motorized transportation modes. The film shows how fundamental smart urban planning is to the quality of life of citizens, and how important these issues are to a town’s vitality and sustainability. After the movie, Ranjit Walia from Civic Eye Collaborative and Hoboken?s Transportation and Parking Director Ian Sacs will speak about the importance of community outreach and sustainable transportation, and help guide the audience through a “visual preference survey” to engage in a discussion about where, how, and if similar transportation strategies could work in our communities. Lunch refreshments will be served, and attendees will be eligible to participate in a free raffle!

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Middlesex County Says Stop for Pedestrians

Monday, May 9 by silvia

Middlesex County has created a traveling sign aimed at informing motorists about the law that took effect last year and requires motorists to stop — not just yield — for pedestrians in crosswalks. The sign also spells out the consequences of those caught not doing so: two points plus a $200 fine.

The sign can be requested by any Middlesex municipality. So where would be a good spot in Plainsboro? “Pick a street, ANY street” is what we were told via Facebook. What do you think?

The Middlesex County sign looks like this:

Middlesex County's traveling sign

The WWBPA made up its own signs last year:

571/Wallace-Cranbury morning commute 2

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May is National Bike Month

Friday, April 29 by silvia

Did you know that on average, 40% of our trips are two miles or less?

Take part in National Bike Month by resolving to ride your bike more often, whether to work, the store, the library, the train station or to a friend’s house. We don’t need to remind you of the $4 a gallon gas you’ll be saving. Need another reason? The week of May 15 is National Bike to Work Week, and May 20 is Bike to Work Day. Stop at the Princeton Junction train station on May 16 for a bikers breakfast courtesy of the WWBPA and the Greater Mercer Transportation Management Association.

West Windsor has added many bike lanes in recent years, and the WWBPA can help you find safe routes using them and quiet roads as much as possible. (Google maps and Mapquest also have bike-route-mapping features.)

Don’t forget some of the rules of the road: Always ride WITH traffic, obey all traffic rules (red lights, stop signs) and be visible and predictable at all times. The WWBPA sells reflective ankle bands, safety vests, helmets and entry-level lights; see us at the West Windsor Farmers’ Market or email [email protected].

The WWBPA also is participating or promoting many bike events in May. See our newsletter for the list!

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How to Bike with Traffic

Wednesday, April 27 by JerryFoster

Why bike with traffic? There are lots of good reasons to bike to the grocery store, school, or the post office: better health, less pollution, save some money, among others. But it’s not as easy as a quick drive to and then bike on the D&R Canal path; you have to know how to successfully navigate with the other, larger vehicles on the road. There’s a training course just for that, and it’s being held in nearby North Brunswick!

The North Brunswick Township Parks and Recreation Department is proud to partner with the New Jersey Bike and Walk Coalition Bicycle Education Program to offer Traffic Skills 101 for bicyclists. Following a well-established curriculum from the League of American Bicyclists and taught only by certified League Cycling Instructors, Traffic Skills 101 gives cyclists the confidence they need to ride safely and legally in traffic or on the trail.

The course covers bicycle safety checks, fixing a flat, on-bike skills and crash-avoidance techniques and includes a student manual. Recommended for adults and children above age 14, this fast-paced, nine-hour course prepares cyclists for a full understanding of vehicular cycling.The class will be limited to 15 students and will only be held if more than 5 students are registered.

Date:? Saturday, May 7, 2011, 9 AM until 5 PM

Place:? North Brunswick Township Municipal Building

Cost:? $50 per student

Please click on this link to the WalkBike Jersey blog for more information, and enjoy the course!

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Ride of Silence 2011

Thursday, April 21 by silvia

The WWBPA is delighted to support a Ride of Silence in West Windsor on May 18.

Ride of Silence is an international event to raise awareness among motorists that we are here and? to honor those who have been injured or killed while cycling on the roads. Although cyclists have a legal right to share the road with motorists, the motoring public often isn’t aware of these rights, and sometimes not aware of the cyclists themselves.

At 7? p.m. local time around the world on May 18, the Ride of Silence will begin and roll across the globe in a silent procession. Each ride lasts just one hour and covers 10 to 12 miles. Cyclists ride in a group no faster than 12 mph and will remain silent during the ride. The event is free and is part of the WWBPA’s events for National Bike Month.

West Windsor’s Ride of Silence will start at the West Windsor Municipal Center on Clarksville Road. All you need to bring is a bike in good riding condition, helmet, squirt water bottle, spare tube, ID, cell phone and any other necessities you require. It will be dusk when we finish so don’t forget lights and, if you have one, a reflective vest to make you even more visible. Please arrive at 6:45 p.m.

A second Ride of Silence will roll from Van Horne Park (behind Princeton Fitness and Wellness Center) in Skillman.

Questions? Kyle is leading the West Windsor ride and is reachable at [email protected]. Heather is leading the Skillman ride and is reachable at [email protected].

Help spread the word and see you there!

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What’s in West Windsor’s Capital Budget

Friday, April 8 by silvia

West Windsor has a number of bicycle and pedestrian-friendly plans that will be funded during the fiscal year that begins July 1. The budget (including the capital budget) is to be introduce at the April 11 Township Council meeting, followed by a public hearing and adoption later this month.

This is what’s been proposed (but items still could be cut). Please let officials know that you support these plans!

  • An extension of the Dinky Line trail, filling in missing pedestrian connections on a route parallel to the Dinky Line between Vaughn Drive and Route 1. This would be funded through the township’s sidewalk extension program, but the WWBPA hopes it will be treated as a multi-use trail, providing cyclists with a safe alternative to Alexander Road (and eventually extended over Route 1).
  • An extension of the bike lanes on Edinburg Road, from Village Road East to the entrance of Mercer County Park. This would mean a continuous bike lane from the intersection of South Mill Road and Route 571 (close to a crossing of the Trolley Line Trail) down to the park entrance and almost to Old Trenton Road. According to the capital improvement budget, design work would be done in August and September, followed by engineering work and the preparation of bid documents, and then the actual bidding. Construction is anticipated for August to November 2012.
  • A traffic light at Canal Pointe Boulevard and Meadow Road. The WWBPA last year supported a letter from a Canal Pointe resident calling for traffic lights (both letters are here) and called for a road diet to help make the road safer. This traffic light is a step in the right direction, but we would like to see other recommendations made in a recent study. Design and engineering work for this was funded two years ago, and the budget would provide the second $75,000 for construction. Construction is planned for between August and October of this year. The budget also calls for funding engineering work for a traffic light at Canal Pointe and Carnegie Center Boulevard that would be installed in another year.

More bicycle and pedestrian improvements are planned in the following five years of township’s six-year capital program.

  • The? bike-lane extension program through 2016 calls for adding bike lanes along North Post Road between Woodmeadow Lane and Village Road West; Village Road West between the Windsor Ponds Development and Quakerbridge Road; Village Road East between Old Trenton Road and South Lane; Alexander Road between Wallace Road and Route 571/Princeton-Hightstown Road; and Harris Road between Alexander Road and Clarksville Road.
  • The sidewalk-extension program through 2016 calls for sidewalks on Cranbury Road between Sunnydale Way and Route 571; South Mill Road between Village Road East and Edinburg Road; Millstone Road between Cranbury Road and Plainsboro Township border; Cranbury Road between Clarksville Road and Van Nest Park; Clarksville Road between Cranbury Road and Princeton Hightstown Road; Rabbit Hill Road between Route 571 and Bennington Drive; North Post Road between Clarksville Road and Village Road West; Conover Road between Ginnie Lane and Aldrich Way; North Mill Road between Clarksville Road and Route 571.

What’s missing, in the WWBPA’s opinion, is any mention of completing the sidewalk on Route 571 between Clarksville and Wallace roads. This should be a priority for our downtown and should be done as soon as possible. Watch our video to see just how few gaps there are!

We encourage the township to use money for sidewalk repairs and intersection upgrades to fix a couple of the problem spots in the next 12 months and to consider installing the missing sidewalks for our downtown without waiting for the yet-to-be approved and financed overhaul of Route 571.We know this is an “interim” measure until Mercer County reconstructs the road, but “interim” can be a very long time. It’s also unlikely that the sidewalks would move if the road is reconfigured.

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West Windsor Historic Bike Trail

Wednesday, April 6 by JerryFoster

Paul Ligeti of Troop 66, sponsored by Dutch Neck Presbyterian Church, is creating a bike route for his Eagle Scout project. The trail will pass by many of West Windsor’s historic sites, which are described on his project website. Please support Paul’s effort!

Please remember that when riding on the roadway, a bicyclist has all the rights and responsibilities of a motorist, including following traffic signals and stop signs, etc. Do not ride against traffic! Besides being the law, following the rules of the road has been shown to be safest for everyone, since motorists and bicyclists behave in a common predictable way. Enjoy your ride!

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Upcoming Events

Monthly meetings are held on the second Thursday of the month, either at 6:45 pm at the WW library or at 7 pm via Zoom. Email us at [email protected] for details, including the Zoom code.

Find us at the West Windsor Farmers Market (Vaughn Drive parking lot) from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every other Saturday from May through Halloween.

July 23 — Weekly walking group at Community Park

July 27 — find us at the farmers market

July 30 — Weekly walking group at Community Park

Aug. 6 — Weekly walking group at Community Park

Aug. 6 — National Night Out at Community Park

Aug. 8 — monthly meeting

Aug. 10 — find us at the farmers market

Aug. 13 — Weekly walking group at Community Park

Aug. 20 — Weekly walking group at Community Park

Aug. 24 — find us at the farmers market

Aug. 27 — Weekly walking group at Community Park

Sept. 3 — Weekly walking group at Community Park

Sept. 10 — Weekly walking group at Community Park

Sept. 12 — monthly meeting

Sept. 17 — Weekly walking group at Community Park

Sept. 21 — At Community Day, Duck Pond Park

Sept. 24 — Weekly walking group at Community Park

Oct. 10 — monthly meeting

Oct. 26 — bike drive for Bike Exchange, at the WW farmers market

Nov. 14 — monthly meeting

Dec. 12 — monthly meeting

Become a Member/Donate

Pace Car Program

Ongoing – Register your bike with the WW Police Department for free

Volunteer Opportunities – Sign up to give back to the community

Now Accepting Applications for WWBPA Student Advisory Board

March 14 — annual meeting; guest speaker is Charles Tennyson, head of transporation for Princeton University

April 11 — monthly meeting

May 9 — monthly meeting

June 13 — monthly meeting

July 11 — monthly meeting

Aug. 8 — monthly meeting

Sept. 12 — monthly meeting

Oct. 10 — monthly meeting

Nov. 14 — monthly meeting

Dec. 12 — monthly meeting

Become a Member/Donate

Pace Car Program

Ongoing – Register your bike with the WW Police Department for free

Volunteer Opportunities – Sign up to give back to the community

Now Accepting Applications for WWBPA Student Advisory Board

More Events »

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